"You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face.
You must do the thing which you think you cannot do." -Eleanor Roosevelt

Teen Behavior: What to do When Things Get Violent

October 12, 2009 by  
Filed under Blog, Parenting, Teens

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Photo by Flickr

Photo by Flickr

What do you do with teen behavior like this? He has punched holes in the walls, is mouthy, violent, aggressive, makes his sister cry and steals her Mp3 player. When parents have to deal with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) or just simply violent teen behavior, that they do not know where to turn.

Let us look at what is going on here. Latest studies show that our brains go on developing until we are about 25. That is one of the reasons why powerful mind altering drugs are not such a good idea. This means in practice that our brains which control our impulses, and even some of our emotions are still not fully developed when we are teenagers. Research also tells us that the parts of the brain which is called the limbic system is what controls our reaction to a fight, flight or freeze response. This is basically what controls our aggressive instincts.

So, how do you deal with this sort of teen behavior? Research shows that children from violent homes are much more likely to be violent adults. We also know that behavior modification techniques learned by parents on child behavior programs are the only way to break this cycle. When the children of parents who had been on these courses were compared to those parents who simply did nothing, there was a 60% difference in the reduction of violence and other problem behavior. This research was carried out at the Feinberg School of Medicine at the Northwestern University.

Violent kids and teens are a big problem in the Chicago area and I know that chief of the Chicago Public Schools has implemented a drastic change of policy. Instead of strict curfews and video cameras everywhere, the school authorities are now concentrating on conflict resolution and dealing with the kids’ emotional needs. Child psychologists believe that there are protective factors such as learning social and emotional skills which can help kids to pull back from the brink of violence. The Director of the Institute for Juvenile Research at the University of Illinois certainly is a great supporter of this approach.

Parents of oppositional defiance disorder (ODD) teens can help their abusive and violent children by following behavior modification techniques. They learn how to set the limits, help the teen to develop coping skills and also how he can treat people like fellow human beings. Parents learn how giving in and even bargaining can give power to their teen’s defiance and make the situation even worse. Find out how you can make the situation much better and get back in control again by clicking on the link below.

Want to learn how I dealt with violent teen behavior ? Discover a whole new world and learn about behavior modification techniques. Smart parenting is the key to successful ADHD treatment and the problem child. Sign up for FREE Parenting tips on
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  • http://childbehavior.myopenid.com/ Childbehavior

    Some great information about teen behavior in this article. Thank you for posting it.

  • http://childbehavior.myopenid.com/ Childbehavior

    Some great information about teen behavior in this article. Thank you for posting it.

  • http://www.teen-boarding-school.com/teen-boarding-schools/christian-adhd-boarding-schools.html Leo on Private Schools ADHD

    This is really helpful information. Teens with violent behavior should be given serious professional help before it worsens, I believe there are therapeutic schools who also deals with very violent teens out there. I guess parents should be aware of their kid's needs and do something to deal with the problem rather than leave it as it is. Thanks for sharing!

  • http://help4you-adhd.com/ ADHD Children

    My son has ADHD and I know how frustrating it can be to get
    help and support.Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is becoming one of
    the most diagnosed disorders among children and even adults these days.